Mental Health & Heating Engineers

Mental Health & Heating Engineers

15th Apr 2019


 
There’s a stigma around discussing mental health that we think needs to change. It’s time to encourage more people to have open and honest conversations about mental health, especially in the workplace.

In the UK, the most common cause of death among men between 20-49 is suicide and many men working in the heating industry fall into this age range. So, we’ve written this article to encourage anyone struggling with their mental health to speak out and get the right support.

A 2018 survey by Mercedes Benz UK Vans found that more than half of van drivers (56%) think there’s a stigma around discussing mental health at work, so don’t feel they can talk about it.

Of the 2,000 van drivers surveyed, those who felt there was a stigma pointed towards it being a ‘male-dominated industry’ as the main reason (50%). While a further 46% didn’t want to discuss their mental health with an employer over fears for job security.

No one should feel that they can’t discuss their mental health for fear of losing their job. Which is why we were encouraged to see the release of the MENTalk Podcast from Installer Online.

The MENTalk Podcast is aiming to challenge the stereotypes tradesmen face by encouraging healthy and open conversation about mental health. You can listen to the MENTalk Podcast here.

Identifying a Mental Health Condition

Mental health comes in many different forms, but two common conditions are Anxiety and Depression. Find out the symptoms of these conditions to help you identify them in yourself or help you support someone else.

Anxiety

Anxiety is a natural feeling of being worried, tense or afraid and is often felt when thinking about upcoming situations or things that could happen. Anxiety can become a mental health condition when it prevents you from living your life as you’d like.

Identifying anxiety

  • Feel anxious for long periods of time
  • Fears or worries are out of proportion to the situation
  • You avoid things that could make you feel anxious
  • Your worries feel very distressing or are hard to control
  • You experience panic attacks
  • It’s hard for you to do things you enjoy

Depression

Depression can interfere with your day-to-day life and remain with you for long periods of time, making you feel like it will never go away. Severe depression can be life threatening, making the sufferer feel suicidal.

Identifying depression

  • Self-harming or suicidal behaviour
  • Find it hard to speak, think clearly or make decisions
  • Feeling no pleasure in the things you would normally enjoy
  • Feelings of isolation
  • Low or no self-confidence or self-esteem

These are only a couple of mental health conditions so if you can’t relate to anything we’ve mentioned above, it’s still okay to seek help.

If you’ve been diagnosed with either of the above mental health problems, or can relate to them, talking about how you feel can really help. Who you wish to talk to is completely up to you, it could be a friend, family member or mental health professional.

So don’t be afraid to speak out, there’s always someone who will listen.

Where to Seek Mental Health Support

In addition to turning to family, friends and colleagues for help with your mental health, there are professionals and services that are also able to offer support:

  • A doctor (GP)
  • Therapist
  • Charities such as Mind and the Samaritans
  • Community mental health teams

There are also phone numbers you can call any time too if you need to talk to someone:

  • Samaritans: 116 123 (24 hours a day)
  • Anxiety UK: 03444 775 774 (Monday to Friday, 9.30am to 5.30pm)
  • Mind: 0300 123 3393 (Mon to Fri, 9am to 6pm)

Remember, you don’t have to struggle, there’s always somewhere to turn to even if it doesn’t feel like it.